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this at all, richard, to discredit the president on foreign policy? >> i have to say that i think that benghazi is largely a function of people who suffer from obama-derangement syndrome, because i think that people who are kind of looking at the facts, does this trace to the white house, and does it trace to the president or the secretary of the state, and i h think that every bit of information that we have so far the answer to all of the questions so far is no. might they keep hammering it? of course, but at the end of the day, i don't believe we will look back in the second term and said, man, they should have gotten that benghazi behind them, because they have. >> and do you think that we will be talking about benghazi coming up? >> we, the facts and the more that the white house and the administration says this happened and by the way, that happened and not just from the partisan perspective, but coming from the state department and so forth, and with all respect, it is the senate role to ask the tough questions and the question is whether or not it is a legitimate con ver
tonight. the fight against al qaeda and militant islam in africa. one of the many foreign policy challenges for the commander and chief's second term. the state department today confirmed that last week's hostage standoff at a gas plant in algeria did kill three americans: according to the prime minister. two canadians and team of explosive experts who had planned to blow up the place. the prime minister also said the military operation to free those hostage resulted in the deaths of dozens of prisoners. you will recall last week the militants stormed the facility near the lib i can't be border. according to the al gearian they claim it was pay back for algeria letting french jets use airspace to attack infamous fighters in neighboring mali. jonathan hunt has this in new york tonight. jonathan, last week we had a lot of criticism of the algerians. there seems to be a change in tone now. >> yeah, very much so. last week the british and japanese governments in particular were very critical of what they saw as an overly aggressive and heavy handed response by the algerian security
to say, i am going to for bridget to focus on foreign policy rather than domestic policy. all of that has to come with regards to the dialogue that goes on between any president and the people who put him in office. tavis: this inauguration is special because the president has been inaugurated for a second time on this historic king holiday. this is also the first time any president has been inaugurated while, the steps near where he is inaugurated, is a monument to dr. martin luther king jr. you were with the president when the monument was unveiled. offer some reflections on what that experience was like. >> obviously, that was a tremendous experience last year. that monument, i spent some much of my life, the last 10 years, helping to design it. i tell the whole story about how we wanted to be a monument not just to king, but to the tremendous freedom struggle. to be there and watch president obama, i was interested in what he would have to say. no one would question that obama, from a very early age, through his mother, understood king's importance and the importance of the movement.
seconds i want to close it out with you. it seems at times the president left foreign policy to secretary of state hillary clinton. george, do you see him play an extended role in foreign policy or will he late john kerry take the lead. >> i think he will. his speech focused on making sure friends of old enemies. he's focusing on democrac diplomacy. that's something that obama will have to get involved with at that level. i think he will get involved. >> john: one more time, alex, does john kerry have a charisma deficit that the president needs to worry about. >> john kerry has never been known for charisma, but he has been on the stage for a long time and he can hold his own. >> that's why the two of you are always the smartest kids in class. thank you so much for coming on, on this inauguration day. >> thank you. >> john: what would martin luther king jr. be doing if he were alive today? chances are he wouldn't be working for the koch brothers. coming up next. only on current tv. [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just becaus
and construct this bipartisan foreign policy that's been the tradition in this country and helped us win the cold war. >> senator barbara boxer. we were all so young. only so few years ago. senator, thanks very much for joining us. >>ates flashback. interestingly, have you now spoken with senator hagel, former senator hagel, and you have decided that you will support him. tell me what did he say that persuaded you that this was not just a convergence of -- conversion of convenience? that he is really committed to your value system going forward. >> not just did i speak with him at length, but i asked him to put in writing his positions on the various issues of concern to me, which included the issue of sanctions against iran, our relationship with our great ally israel, which included his attitude toward gays in the military, which included his attitude towards making sure that women in the military are protected from rape m military and, many of the, have the same reproductive health care as women outside the military. this wasn't one question. it was a series of questions. i will say a
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
's more into foreign policy. >> eleanor, i'm curious how much you think approval ratings matter in a second term. you are not running for office again, but let's face it, popularity will also potentially equate with political capital. >> well, that's right. popularity equates with how much you can get done on capitol hill. i heard you say that bill clinton was one of two president who is rose in popularity second term nap's despite he was impeached. >> small detail. >> he was able to cash in on that because he pitted the american people against the congress. that's the opening this president has. i'm heartened by the fact they'll take organizing for america and make it organizing advocacy. i don't know why they didn't do that in the first term. i'm pretty optimistic about what he can get done. we've seen transformation in american society with the acceptance of gay marriage, transformation in the media. there could be transformations on capitol hill. if the president isn't able to accomplish, for example, his gun control agenda, who's going to look bad on that? that could have r
on guaranteed income and the same policies in terms of imperial foreign policy is at work. i was glad to see romney did not win. we push back the right-wing takeover. we have a right wing mentality. where is a serious talk about investment, jobs, fighting privatization of education? our battle is just beginning. we have yet to take off the gloves. we have been fighting. >> president obama said to harry belafonte, according to harry, why don't you and cornell west, some slack? and harry belafonte responded, what might makes you think we are not? >> exactly. i want to ask you about bill o'reilly and tavis smiley. i don't know if you're watching fox on election night, but this is what bill o'reilly had to say about the outcomes of the election. >> what is your sense? he looked at these exit polls. >> my sense of the evening is, is that romney loses in ohio, the president is reelected. >> how do think we got to that point questor president obama's approval rating was so low. this is hypothetical. we don't know who is even winning right now, never mind who won. how do think it got this tight. >>
on policy during the great depression, specifically how the fed could have handled things better. in fact, in 2000, he wrote a paper entitled a crash course for central bankers, which was published in foreign policy. he has a deep and longstanding commitment as well to education. he recently took a timeout to do a town hall meeting for k-12 teachers. so i am particularly pleased to say that, joining us in the audience, is an advanced placement economic class from a high school. we're delighted to have you with us. a word about our format. for the first portion of our time, dr. bernanke will join me here on the stage in a conversation about a number of economic issues. for the rest of the time, he has graciously agreed to take questions from the audience. around 4:30, our staff will be coming through the aisle to get question cards from you. those watching on line and those of you in the audience are welcome to tweet your questions as well. we will select questions, along with two of our graduates students. it is my great pleasure and honor to welcome to the stage chairman ben bernanke. [a
might have climate change, the foreign policy or restructuring of america's place in the world. prams leading from the back as he said in stern phases rather than the front. i'm in favor of that. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about it and will tackle it this year. there's common sense agreement out in the states how to do it. i think you'll see the president work passionately across party lines on education to make our k through 12 system the best in the world like our university system is. you hit the biggest one and that's economy. we have to continue to take steps. >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> talks about education is if we're going to be competitive, we have to do a better job on education. we've got to control our energy in the future. we've got to develop new sources of energy. we've got to invest in research and development and stay on the cutting edge of innovation. all these things are an sbintegl part of develo
. economy, obviously. you might have climate change. >> right. >> the foreign policy, the restructuring if you like of america's place in the world, taking on where barack obama has taken it so far. very interesting. perhaps leading from the back as he said in certain cases rather than from the front. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about we'll tackle this year. everyone out there understands our system is broken. and we need some fundamental restructuring of it. right thing to do. there's common sense agreement out in the states on how to do it. people putting politics aside. i think you will see the president in the second term work passionately across party lines on education to make the k-12 system the best in the world like the university system is. you hit the biggest one, that's the economy. we have to continue to take the steps -- >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> as a government -- >> talks about education, it is axiomat
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
but decided to make a bold foreign policy statement. what are the considerations that go into choosing what you say. >> when you look at the history of inaugural addresses there are some determined by the trajectory of history. john f. kennedy gave a speech that codified the moral commitments of the cold war. ronald reagan's first inaugural speech was an economic speech. the context was inflation which was a threat to the country at that time. but most of others, bush was like that too, most of the other good ones, jefferson's first or whatever, they're really about the values that unite the country and then also try to put your moment in the broad long context of american history. why this is important and how we're led forward. without being a policy address, it says we have certain values that mean we have to confront certain problems. if i was working on this speech, which i'm not, i would address this problem of polarization, the deep divisions of our country, how we get passed that, achieve common purposes in this country and the president would benefit even in the partisan debates lo
that existed in june of 2006 is considered success. and it is not. this continues to be a terrible foreign policy mistake. and now we are confronted with the question, how do we clean up the mess. >> senator obama knew he needed to have a presidential level of credibility in such hearings. republican senator marco rubio has been talking tough about benghazi for months. >> one of the narratives that the obama campaign has laid out, osama bin laden is dead, they retreated. you start to say do they allow any story to emerge that counters that narrative. is that why they told us that benghazi was a popular uprising, because it ran counter to their campaign narrative. >> and so the pressure was on senator rubio to deliver to all his fans all the fire and brim stone they had a right to expect. he was not just facing the secretary of state, who took responsibility for what happened in benghazi. he was facing possibly the next democratic nominee for president. tonight, the marco rubio fans could not be more disappointed. >> one of the things that i'm more interested in exploring to you, how inform
republican friends to be fair. i used to put republicans because i would trust them or on foreign policy. i think anybody who is fair and would look at the president's record -- he has done a wonderful job of advancing our interests as well as protecting us. once again, thank you 4 c- span.org so much. i am enjoying the coverage. host: naomi tweets in -- the metro stations here are very crowded. as we mentioned, metro is planning a rush hour schedule, which means a train every five- six minutes at every station throughout the day because of the large crowds. about 800,000 is the current estimate, to attend the inauguration wendy is on american calling in from sydney, australia. good afternoon, good evening, good morning to you. caller: it is good evening here. host: are you watching online? caller: i am watching on tv, on cable. i spent a good portion of my adult life here, but i am constantly reading -- reading the news about the state. i still consider myself a think sometimes my perspective gives me a broader vision. i can see the discord, the downside of what has been happening, but i c
with president george w. bush and foreign policy will be happening in the second term. >> the first thing that strikes me on a day like today is what a wonderful celebration this is with our democracy. the peaceful transfer of power. of course president obama is being affirmed again, but we look at our institutions. you see the supreme court justice swear in the president. it's a wonderful thing and it's something that when you've traveled around the world, not every country can take this moment for granted. when the will of the people is confirmed and affirmed the way we're going to see today. >> the president is speaking to the world, he's speaking to the united states, he's speaking to the people in washington and he's speaking to republicans. what does he need to say to republicans? >> on inaugural day, it is really the high point for any presidency, i think, because after that we start to get back to our regular criticism, and we did this wrong and that wrong, and so i would hope the president would use the opportunity to say i've won the election, but this
the country the stakes could not be higher. the debt, deficit, entitlement reform. immigration, foreign policy problems tend to be incredibly important in second terms as presidents realize, while they become lame ducks that advancing domestic agenda legislation is very difficult. we'll see the president likely travel more and deal with much of his international legacy. trying to wrap up his second term as best he can with so much unfinished foreign policy business he inhurted from bush administration. buckle up, jeff. not with standing the poet's kind words and the president's lofty rhetoric, washington tomorrow goes back into the being the political crawl city it has been in past years and likely to escalate more so. happy day, shep. shepard: happy day. at least we have today and men and women from both political parties, from the far right, far left and all of those in the middle, they're about to sit down for some individual tils. happy they are all are, dvittles. secretary lew and the rest for new cabinet sick tears all with fights ahead. we seen former presidents interacting with paul ry
and cody keenan. ben rhodes usually takes the foreign policy side of things. jon favreau, he's usually most involved in this big vision. >> >> jennifer: he's like 31 years old. >> cody keenan also young. he always plays a hand in this. my guess would be -- i haven't spoken to favreau about this. he would be working on this closely with president obama. they do the speeches up until the last minute. on the nobel prize acceptance speech, obama came down from his hotel room with a copy of the speech, went to the fourth floor and gave changes to make on the way over to receive the speech. that could be going on right now. >> john: these guys write the speeches in terms of overview. they're there for structure and tone but it is the president himself who decides what the final content is going to be and who makes the revisions he needs to. how deep his editorial involvement is. >> jennifer: if you're going to be true to who you are, as president, you have to -- you have to have input on this. the language has to come from you, naturally. he's a good writer. obviously he's got significant opinion
to foreign policy. but the biggest thing is that 1600 pennsylvania avenue is kind of a dangerous neighborhood. if you hang around there long enough, the odds start going against you. often the second term has been very tough for presidents. we'll see if this one can avoid that precedent. >> never heard it described that way. dangerous neighborhood. dangerous territory. >> yes. >> ron brownstein, nice to see you this morning. thank you very much. >>> next hour, what are we missing? is there an issue that no one is talking about now that will define the president's second term? we'll explore the possibilities. victor? >> all right. some of the drama at this year's sundance film festival is political. we'll talk with the stars of a couple documentaries that come straight out of the history books. >>> first i want to take you to a beautiful place, the foothills of the sierra nevada mountains. artists are working with doctors and scientists to create some mi mind-blowing products. gary tuchman has more in this week's start small, think big. >> reporter: these skilled glassblowers are creating anat
the president issued a memorandum instructing more engagement in foreign policy around lgbt people. this is having humongous impact. >> humongous impact. >> all over the world and real life saving important things. we need that engagement to continue. >> yeah. >> we need all the work that's going on around health care, which is so important to all americans. you know, the medicaid expansion thing that we talk about a lot in terms of other populations for transgender people it is hugely important. so many of us have been impover shed. >> many americans aren't aware of it. they understand we have a set of protections on if you are a woman, a set of protections on your religion. i don't think many people realize in this country, if you are a transgender woman or a transgender man or gay or lesbian, you can lose your job in many states in this country. >> there's been legislation on it since 1974. it's been discussed in congress. we do not have this. it's something the president can put his weight behind and push for as well. there's something else i want to mention. california passed
it a foreign policy of hope and change. a change, and you let it happen and you hope it works out. you hope the secularists, when in actuality we know who's filled that vacuum it's been al-qaeda, and from libya and syria trying to take down the regime in egypt. in algeria, mali, across the board they're on the roll and this administration refuses to acknowledge it it. >> brian: what's interesting, whether you agree with president bush or not, he had a freedom agenda, would put advisors on the ground or domestic forces and go in there in quick strike operations. what is this president's mission, is it all about drones with hell-fire missiles? >> it seems like, afghanistan we're headed for the exits even sooner than he talked about on the campaign trail. he's got the quote, flexibility for the second term. i think he believes that with drone strikes and special operators he can affect things enough and anybody who's been on the ground knows it's intelligence on the ground, relationships, even if it's not a massive war front bilike iraq or afghanistan, it's events on the ground that affect not
. in that it was almost entirely about foreign policy. we would go anywhere, bear any price, pay any price, bear any burden to ensure the survival of liberty. this time, the president's foreign policy really was disspilled into seven words, a decade of war is now ending, the contrast of the last half century is striking. >> and jonathan karl who covers the white house for us, jon, i know you're in the capitol steps, the president saying we can't succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone yet the bulk of the speech really praised and support and encouragement for all the things we do together through our government. >> george, i felt during much of that speech like i was listening to a democratic ronald reagan where reagan was unapologetically conservative. this was unapologetically progressive saying we must act collectively. and this was also bound with optimism saying america's possibilities are limitless. this was an effort, i believe, at that kind of optimistic progressivism whereas a reagan was your optimistic conservatism. also, i was very struck by on
far into foreign policy that it's inevitable that we're going to find places where we have funded people who are actually against us. as you know, i'm for less foreign involvement. >> another question from the web. the president talked about climate change. not something obviously that we've heard a lot about in the debates you've been discussing for the past hour or so. your thoughts on where this might go in this 113th congress. >> my instinct is what you heard in the president's inauguration speech, he was trying to basically throw a bone to every left wing activist group he could. and so start to think about this more from this white house. they've received so much pressure from labor and from those of us who, you know, want the economy to grow on things like the keystone pipeline. >> i think it's a company that wants money like solyndra. >> but you start to see the game being played. this goes back to my earlier discussion if you actually just read the speech and wrote side notes on it saying, oh this is for this constituency, this is to make this group money, oh, but if i do
fiscal cliff discussion, the economy is going to get zooming, we're going to -- foreign policy. >> it could end up being in foreign policy, drawing down troops, transitioning to this new kind of fighting force with the drone warfare, sort of in keeping with what we're alluding to eisenhower had. >> i think we're going to watch too very different but equally fascinating dramas play out. inside washington, the republicans still have the votes to stop the president on many things. they still control the house. they still have operational gridlock in the senate, if you will, even though democrats picked up. inside washington, the president has a challenge. but if you look at this, groundbreaking on gaye rights, back to climate change, gun control, immigration. and who that appeals to, as jack just said. they have made a doubling down of what they did in the campaign. they believe they have the coalition of the future -- young people, latinos, african-americans, and they believe the republican coalition is aging, in decline, and fractured. so they think politically they have the jui
's a sign that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our government's reckless fiscal policies. leadership means that the buck stops here. instead, washington is shifting the burden of bad choices today on the backs of our children and grandchildren, therefore intend to oppose the effort to increase america's debt limit. in 2008, candidate obama blamed president bush and called the growing debt unpatriotic. >> number 43 added 4 trillion dollars by his lonesome so that we now have over 9 trillion dollars of debt that we are going to have to pay back, $30,000 for every man, woman and child, that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> mike: unpatriotic. 9 trillion dollars in debt 2008. we're 16 1/2 trillion dollars in debt today. all right. joining me now, former house speaker newt gingrich. mr. speaker, great having you with me tonight. [applause] >> good to be with you, governor. i must say that was a terrific lead-in and one i kind of wish the president had seen. >> mike: well, i want to begin asking you, does it strike you as odd? the medi
can't pay its own bills, it's a sign that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our government's reckless fiscal policies. leadership means that the buck stops here. instead, washington is shifting the burden of bad choices today on the backs of our children and grandchildren, therefore intend to oppose the effort to increase america's debt limit. in 2008, candidate obama blamed president bush and called the growing debt unpatriotic. >> number 43 added 4 trillion dollars by his lonesome so that we now have over 9 trillion dollars of debt that we are going to have to pay back, $30,000 for every man, woman and child, that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> mike: unpatriotic. 9 trillion dollars in debt 2008. we're 16 1/2 trillion dollars in debt today. all right. joining me now, former house speaker newt gingrich. mr. speaker, great having you with me tonight. [applause] >> good to be with you, governor. i must say that was a terrific lead-in and one i kind of wish the president had seen. >> mike: well, i want to begin asking you, does it st
of the second administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for b
public policy, it is a foreign concept. that is exactly what martin did. he put love at the center of the public square. why have we abandoned that notion? >> the rule of money. everybody and everything is up for sale. you cannot have integrity, love, you cannot have trust if everything and everybody is up for sale. if you're leaders are up for sale, they will talk one way, get inside, and do something else. it is big money. for black people who have been hated for 400 years, hatred comingized a stric after us, and we dish out martin king, that love in the face of the hatred, that is a spiritual and moral high ground. the whole country has to take note of it with martin. the whole world has to take note of it. that is what is weak and feeble. it is not a question of speed -- skin pigmentation. it is a question of equality and morality of your speech rowdy. all of us fall short. [applause] >> now it is competition. the president takes no child left behind, which is the worst education law in my lifetime -- [applause] straight out of charles dickens. train them for exams, do not let
-- but love, at the center of our public policy, it is a foreign concept. that is exactly what martin did. he put love at the center of the public square. why have we abandoned that notion? >> the rule of money. everybody and everything is up for sale. you cannot have integrity, love, you cannot have trust if everything and everybody is up for sale. if your leaders are up for sale, they will talk one way, get inside, and do something else. it is big money. for black people who have been hated for 400 years, institutionalized hatred coming after us, and we dish out martin king, that love in the face of the hatred, that is a spiritual and moral high ground. the whole country has to take note of it with martin. the whole world has to take note of it. that is what is weak and feeble. it is not a question of skin pigmentation. it is a question of equality and morality of your spirituality. all of us fall short. [applause] >> now it is competition. the president takes no child left behind, which is the worst education law in my lifetime -- [applause] straight out of charles dickens. train them for
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